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five books and i wrote and donated to the library here for a processor of school and two years at law school and i use it for legal history too. so i am familiar with the collection of this library and i know that a lot of it is missing, but not missing but it is in a different part of the... it is a different area of the library and it is not accessible. my research takes me to other state laws and other decisions some international treatties and secondary sources that are not available and, a table of contents and the index is considerably more convenient than the on-line sources which are inadequate. i do use them because i had a lexus account when i was a law student. it was restricted to non-commercial use. and frankly, i go to the library to make sure that my research is thorough. that on-line services don't have the historical treeties and occasionally i reference them going back to the 1930s. and so i urge you to provide for the sufficient space for this library. >> thank you. >> my name is christopher heys and i have been practicing law in san francisco since 1974. i'm not an
that stuff. and the problem is that a lot of the resources that are in the law library across the street are not available on-line. for example, many of the older cases are not available on-line, the data base i subscribe to goes back to 1930. and when i practiced law at the firm that had a library, many years ago, the older law books, the older case books were gotten weathered and i called it getting into a leather when you (inaudible) that it was relevant. the beauty of those cases that was decided before the turn of the last century is that in those days, the courts decided the case in a page or two. and nowadays, it is like 30 or 40 pages, if you can find one that is relevant it is good to say it. and the second thing that they had there was the directorry and i found my dad who practiced in new jersey many years ago back in 19933 edition, i use it for looking up judges and attorneys and the historical use of that is good too. >> good morning, my name is (inaudible) santacruise and i am here m my capacity as a sole practitioner and also the president of the san francisco lasada lawye
is acceptable for the law liable at 1200 van ness boulevard. >> thank you president including this came up again last week was a bit of a contiguous group. there are others who understand the importance of the law library. it's a law that requires that our law library is suitable space. right now the law library is in the memorial building. previously it was housed here in city hall and the memorial building is is going to be closed and all tenants have to be out by july. it's going to cost the city hundreds of dollars a month. this is suitable and sufficient and is going to a delegate the department to finalize the lease. they determined 22 thousand feet was sufficient and it includes compacting shelving for the law library. this passes unanimously. the controversies arose from the advocates they have thirty to 35 thousand square feet of space. this included a request that we house a volumes for the law library. and from my prospective were facing increased costs over $5,000 and not particle sure at this time this we should be paying to house additional rare books that the law library is
york school of the university of law. i am proud of the tradition of civic pride and justice. >> san francisco has a legal obligation to provide adequate law library space for the needs of city and county of san francisco. it is a vital resource and a just (inaudible) public courts of law. i have been an active patron of the san francisco law library for the past 15 years and over that time i have become acutely aware of the need of each and every aspect of the law library, including the books, the internet resources the conference space and space for those members of the public and attorneys tho meet, as well as legal education for the public. before i was a member of the california bar, i relied upon the library for the legal research, access from 9 to 5, work schedule preventing me from accessing it, i also helped friends who are not lawyers access the resource whens they were in a panic over their legal situations. when i became a legal professional, i became aware that every system has relied on the library, i i am aware that it is a vital resource for me to meet my ethi
this law library opened, and find permanent space for the next 100 years or more. it is my belief that even though we have a room full of attorneys right here, you also have an army of paralegals behind them, that use the law library as a source and means of empowerment. without it, they have nothing. i have watched this city and county destroy the main library and given it to a bankrupt foundation that you are on the hook for $100 million or more according to the papers. i have watched you build a new library where you destroyed 25 percent of the books and i watched you also close several of the peripheral law libraries in the city. we are down to one library. and the main library, at the veteran's war memorial. you need to find permanent space for it. if you need to find space back in the city hall on the 5th floor, do it. that is where it originally was. if you need to move out the agent foundation by eminent domain, they are in the wrong spot by the way. do it. move the law library back into that building. you need a permanent space of 20,to 25,000 square feet or more for the next 100 y
. so, a public library is absolutely essential for the practice of law. secondly, this is not a situation that effects just sole practitioners or appellant practitioners or the poor, or those who need to help themselves. every day, litigaters in san francisco are running over to the public library because sometimes has come up that they suddenly need a resource for, a case for, a form for, and it is absolutely essential for the practice of law. thank you. >> thank you very much. >> next speaker please? >> good morning. my name is ad win enseln and i am a attorney and practice with a small boutique tax firm. the library serves a valuable purpose and i don't think that anybody disputes that. for our purpose as a small firm in the city we depend on the library for access to legal volumes. many of these are not available on-line and if the library does not have adequate space to house the collection we lose access to those volumes not only us but the members of the public as well. this will negatively impact our ability to practice law in san francisco, and people in
law that i do, civil rights and housing law, and the fact that the library is there, and accessible to propers the people who don't have the attorney is vitally important especially given the fact that there is a housing crisis going on in the state of california. and in this area, in general. and without the law library, here in san francisco and its accessibility and reference for persons that don't have attorneys, i think that to under mine that in any way is a detriment to san francisco. going to the courts and asking for help is not a possibility. to have the third parties such as the law library access to people who don't have access to legal services i think is vitally important and i encourage the board to take that into consideration in formulating your future policies. >> thank you. >> my name is (inaudible) and i am a volunteer with the coalition of concerned legal professionals. i have been working and i have been with the (inaudible) monthly legal orientation sessions. and i have witnessed the need for of the economically disadvantaged people of legal orientation and fo
in the way because most law firms don't take cases that are $5,000 work, $10,000, $20,000 worth. and so where do you go? you go to rent control board and they say no, the clinic is exempt and so they have no jurisdiction and so we need a jury trial to deal with this situation and to do that, you need, there is legal resources and that is why i am here to support san francisco law library, thank you. >> good morning, my name is albert koon and i have used the library 42 years continuously as a sole practitioner and i use it every week at least once and sometimes twice. occasionally three times. the size of light braer as it is right now is too small. and we are using all of the books that are there, and anybody who does his own research like i do, both the state and the federal courts, it is necessary to have that minimum 30,000 square feet. and i urge you to maintain that level and i would like to remind you that just kennedy was also a user of this law library before he went on the supreme court. thank you. >> my name is cathy kusher and i have been a lawyer since 1976 and most of that time
of stacks of books for the law library here. and here. that will accommodate approximately 70 thousand volumes of the books dirge assessable to the public. our rough calculations suggest about 51 thousand volumes are currently available to the public and then at the memorial additional volumes of approximately 20 thousand some volumes are assessable but not immediately assessable this. this appraise for a training place as well more classroom space. approximately 40 seats available within this plan it appraise space important the staffing needs as well the conference rooms within both the staff area and to the public to there are private areas to have depositions and other things. restrooms, of course, and lastly reverse book rooms so some volumes we would want to have more access to are here. what is a 16 thousand square troubleshoot premises. we want a right of first offer up to 5 thousand 5 hundred lower space currently not available but expected to be available in mid-2014 so the city has a first opportunity to lewis lease the space under certain spacing. so the library can begin t
sufficient for the law library >> chair, supervisor kim. i believe with respect to the statements about the existing conditions i think those are statements of fact i don't think the city was trying to take a position it's not the issue where respect to the filing of the court. it's just a statement because i think that context is helpful for the board to making the decision what have they operated over the past 18 years >> the lease before us initially offers 16 hundred and 33 square feet though with the option to grow the 35 feet so would i want it be suitable for the law library since that's what we're offering them. >> but the resolution is worded in a way that their married with the two issues in the case. i believe it is no greater than 20 thousand square feet and by taking the action before the board today your ratifying the terms and conditions of the briefing as well so there isn't a disconnect between the issues >> i feel uncomfortable with that number. i get it could be less than 20 thousand square feet but i think we can provided a lease that is greater than and not
a substantial interest to promote in compliance with the youth sales law in protecting our children from illegally obtaining tobacco. so just the background of why this law exists. there is a lot of laws that exist, and one that i would really like to highlight is you see the old time law book here is the reason that a retailer if a clerk sells to a minor they get a ticket and it is issued a ticket and a fine that is associated with it and it is for code 308 and a violation of a law that you cannot provide tobacco to a person under 18 years of age. and this is a new law? no. you see this book, it is actually from 1906. so the code, 308 you cannot provide tobacco to a minor, and it has been on the books i think from maybe the 1880s or something, but it was in the 1906 version for your interest. there are a lot of laws that have taken effect since then that reinforce the idea that it is illegal to sell to minors. so, these slides, i cannot necessarily read, but, many members of our comment can, the reason that we put these on is that we understand that many people who work in retail estab
security's law imposed on the city, the obligation to insure that is offering documents are accurate and complete. this obligation applies to the individual members of the government bodies approving the disclosure documents as well as the city staff charged with preparing the documents. in 2009, the board of supervisors approved the execution and delivery of the certificates of participation of up to 45 million to partially finance, 65 million to the center. the project has... up to 35 million today and we have used commercial paper to fund the improvements. the remaining $20 million was paid from assessments from (inaudible) district that was established in 2009. the board last approved the distribution of offering statements for and independent day in june of 2012, and the resolution in connection with the issuance of general bonds, 2012, of approximately 290 million for san francisco general hospital as well as (inaudible) emergency response bonds. this resolution approves the form and authorizes the approval (inaudible) and the form of appendix a, which is contained in the offer
found the people who were actually reaching the law all of them were on the computers and if not there's a greater need to increase the term analyze they have. i'm curious i know there were questions by the members of the budget members that we look at ways to partner with other law libraries whether they be the choirs or the main library. that was the main suggestion that the committee pushed the administrators office and the budget of office of real estate. i'm curious i have to question even as it's assessable as the current main law library site why we respect to a larger space that has no resources for the lay. that is $559,000 more than we're currently paying and how can we best share our resources. i'm worried we are under utilizesings our law library with staffing. happy to address those questions. first with respect to the partisanship with the mayor's office and a variety of others to explore opportunity with the - the director was involved with those discussions and other you institutions like other collaborations. it does not have any fruit >> with whom di
laws. i do not have a concealed carry program. they are the only state out of the 50 that does not have one. they do not prosecute. got killedal that there, they're not prosecuting. we need to enforce some of the laws that we have and quit trying to make new laws everytime something happens. host: 1 about if the background check information could be made secure? if there was some sort of privacy protection? is there a level it reached that would satisfy you? caller: yes, if you could guarantee that. that is the biggest question. if the president's wife, which i say is a pretty important person, if personal information can be out there, if they cannot keep that secret, how can they keep the information you're talking about secret? independent on our line, good morning. independentn our line, good morning. caller: i wish more people could read between the lines about this, legislation and all these things they are trying to do. when they say universal, they are talking about a majority of americans. as i know it to this day, in white christian american male and women are the majority in t
into treatment in the first place. there is 4 l's, liver, livelihood, lover or the law. those 4 things. liver, livelihood, lover and law. within those l's is when somebody shows up in my door, someone suffering, a family member suffering who brings somebody in. when it company ms to treat we know there is different types of treatment, there is evidence base treatment. there is good evidence for it, we do it. there is evidence free treatment, there is no evidence whatsoever and there is evidence proof treatment. one of those evidence proof treatment is incarceration treatment. there was an office inspection in general report and eventually matt case became supervisor for it. i have been involved in other places. treatment in custody doesn't work. flash incarceration does not work. as far as the treatment that do work for alcoholism, alcoholism is a chronic disease like diabetes. hypertension and emphysema. when we look at outcomes for chronic disease, a landmark study for the journal medical association in 1999, showed that results for treatments were no worse or better than any other chronic
to watch. >> my pleasure. >> up next on "money"? can't get a job, sue your school. struggling law school graduates file class action lawsuits against their alma maters. the lawyer defending them is going to lay out their case. >>> how can you profit from just answering questions online? it is the biggest challenge facing about.com's brand new ceo. he is here with his plan in a fox business exclusive. more "money" straight ahead. ♪ [ jackie ] its just so frustrating... ♪ the middle of this special moment and i ed to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. ♪ so today, i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder symptoms. [ female announcer ] know that gotta go feeling? ask your doctor about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents, for 24 hours. if you have certain stomach problems or glaoma, or can not empty your bladd, you should not take toviaz. get emergency medical help right away if your face, lips, throat or tongue swells. toviaz can cause blurred
guys, making the law books thicker, putting the massive paperwork and regulations into police resources on the honest people when the drug gangs and evil people and the criminals could care less in connecticut if it passed that law. lou: and this law calling for effectively regulation of various forms. there seems no announcement of a public debate trying to register guns, rifles, shotguns for almost 15 years, just short of $3 billion in that period of time and ended it because it didn't work and it was way too expensive and we have 10 times as many people as the canadiens, so what in the world are people thinking? >> they are not. it is mindless attempt to keep attacking the second amendment and not have an honest conversation about what works. i have seen the pattern before though. they don't enforce existing gun laws, everything the criminals are doing is illegal, that has another gun law, tel so people they've done something. in fact they have done nothing when they won't do what works, which is put armed security, certified security in school, fix the mental health system and enfor
in the laws. and ppp does a very special poll of american conspiracy theories and who believes what. we'll explore with elaine boosler and lizz winstead. the result will make you want to find your passport. today is the 89th birthday of marlon brando and the great singer and musician from the band richard manuel would have been 70, and eddie murphy is 52. and today marks the 40 year anniversary of the first ever hand-held mobile cell phone call tomorrow marks the 40 year anniversary of the first spam for free ringtones this is "viewpoint." >> john: i'm john fugelsang. good evening, this is "viewpoint." the overwhelming gender gab in last november's election may have allowed democrats to feel like they had won the national war on women. but it is the republicans who are waging and winning the battles of women's reproductive freedom at the local level--state by state. in alabama a bill passed the senate yesterday that will limit access to abortions by requiring that doctors who provide the procedure also have to have the ability to admit patients into local hospitals something that local
our editorial page that when we have written about laura's law that some of the post poignant arguments from family members that they have done everything they can do but don't know how to help a loved one. what would you have done? could force treatment made a difference? >> yes. absolutely. laura's law is not forced treatment. i don't know why mr. vega keeps using that word because laura's law is an upfront tool before somebody needs crisis. if they are proven to be a danger to themselves or someone else, a judge tries to get a treatment team and they try to talk with this person and figure out a way for them to stay out of the hospital. we have forced treatment, we have 51/50. my son has been through 51/50 numerous times. he's been slammed with this. this is a horrible experience. laura's law is a tool, only a tool that may help. for whoever can help, and thank god they don't to have go through the other part. i would say the same thing as this officer said is that some people can't help themselves. the not civil to sit here and watch people lose their lives. i can tell
of the way succeeding congresses have often -- have often dealt with laws that they can't amend, but they don't like is to starve the beast and deny appropriations. how does that work in the case of both the ipab and the dodd-frank bill? >> well, it doesn't. that's because the statute allows the secretary power to appropriate to her own agency. i argue that starving the beast doesn't work very well at all because we've been trying that. the exception of a small interruption in the 1990s for 30 or so years right now, and the size of government doesn't -- or government spending doesn't seem to be growing -- or curtailed by the fact that we have human deficits, but in the case of ipab, where the secretary has the ability to appropriate funds, not just to maybe siphon off medicare funds, but appropriate funds to her own agency spelled out in the statute, what else do you need? >> you're right about -- what's in the dodd-frank bill, and to repeat what i said earlier with the consumer agency, it's funded by the fed, so the fed just prints money and gives it money. that doesn't mean that congress is
and relationships of both gay and straight people, all of film share an interest in reforming outdated laws. so this book is a road map for how to get the laws that we need and want now whether we achieve meritor not. it is a road map for protecting their relationships with children, a sharing of family and medical leave to care for our loved ones, a sharing economic security after the death of an economic provider, making sure that the person we choose makes medical decisions for us if we're unable to make them for ourselves. marriage should not be the dividing line between the relationships that count and the relationships that don't. in fact over the course of the last several decades the legal significance of marriage has changed dramatically so that what i am advocating in this book is not so much a rigid breaking from how things have always been done, but rather an extension of changes that have already been made nearly a system -- have already been made in our legal system. i will give a condensed analysis of what has been changed. to do that i will have to ask you to channel your cells
and the law were those who are paid to enforce it. national immigration and customs enforcement council president chris green joins us here tonight. wall street closing bell was a record first quarter with all-time highs in the dow and s&p 500. we will be joined by ubs chief economist. he is here to show us the road ahead. a big win for the defense team. yes, i said for the defense. "dobbs law" taking the case up with two attorneys. well, let's turn first to the president and his call for increased spending. he was in florida today. the environmental protection agency proposing new regulations on gasoline which would raise the price of gas by as much as $0.9 per gallon. fox news senior white house correspondent with our report. >> reporter: as the president headed to miami to propose infrastructure spending and but got a cool reception from republicans on capitol hill, the epa proposed new regulations for cleaner gasoline and less polluting cars that drew hot combination from the oil industry. critics claim bad timing. >> i would say only if gasoline prices were really love and the econ
have it in english and chinese. we have a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've
parties. after that a discussion about how international law can be applied to cyber warfare. then a look at future trends in the aviation industry at a recent summit of the u.s. chamber of commerce. and later, we're live as legal and policy analysts examine the constitutionality of federal boards and commissions created by the dodd-frank and federal health care laws. >> later this week, negotiators meet in kazahkstan for the next round of talks on iran's nuclear program. today the brookings institution holds a preview of the negotiations. speakers include two former officials with the european union and the u.s. national security council who will share their or experiences dealing with iranian negotiators. you can watch the event live beginning at 10 a.m. eastern over on c-span. >> monday night on "first ladies," anna harrisson, whose husband dies after a month in office, louisiana tissue shah tyler who becomes first lady as her husband assumes the presidency, but she passes away just a year and a half later, and julia ty her, who becomes the president's second wife. >> juli
civilian, not law enforcement, not the military, is a problem we don't know in whose hands they're going to be. in this case if you read the documents, it showed clearly that the safe was not secured. well, that's an issue as well. when we were on the show last time i suggested that when we talk about gun locks, we need to make sure those weapons, all weapons are secured so nobody has the opportunity to get their hands on it who does not rightfully should. >> right. let's play a clip from president obama today. he was pretty direct. listen to what he had to say. >> less than 100 days ago, that happened. and the entire country was shocked. the entire country pledged we would do something about it and this time would be different. shame on us if we forgot. i haven't forgotten those kids. shame on us if we forgot. >> here's the problem. these are powerful words from the president, but as he's saying them, washington having already backed off trying to force through an assault weapons ban is now apparently also backing off bringing in a ban on high magazines, and so what are you left with? y
that it was deleted by the desire to prevent it from being disclosed. but as far as the law requires, and what he is required to maintain it does not appear to fit within a document for which retention was required. >> i don't know. my fellow commissioners. >> i guess the question that i have is i am not sure that issue is really raised. because when you read the sections that they claim were violated, 67.25, which is to satisfy an immediate request. there is no doubt that the response that they gave, that they had no e-mails, or they had no documents, was a correct response. and the question is, that commissioners studley was asking about whether there was some practice of going to the it department as being part of it, well there is no way that an immediate request that anybody could contemplate that you were going to go to the it department that is 24 hours. and so, that it strikes me that the response was a correct response that he had no e-mails in his... that he was aware of. and 6726 is where you withhold a document. there is no evidence of any withholding of a document or 67.27 is you hav
communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is
hearings. last refresher slide on your screen, the law of today, we talked a good deal about this on your march 14th hearing, this is a long standing policy regardless of everything else, the commission are balanced by the current law that you either prove a conditional use politics -- application or we continue a building permit. next is to talk about what's changed. there is three items. historically almost all of your approvals have contained a provision that stop the clock when there is an extraordinary delay caused by a public agency. this dropped out of your earlier policy and this is with long and standing practice. it's not a policy change. secondly in your clarification policy, as mentioned in your last hearing we have made a clerical fix to move project out of it's performance period is the right practice and is what you intend. the last item here is that we have amended at your direction, the stimulus policy to apply to projects that have already received and extension from the commission to the extent possible. the implementation of this and the real world is going to depend
't the justices be weary indeed of messing with it? >> look, not only is it the law in california, but the law in 29 other states, only failed two or three times, depending on how you define failure. across the country, this is states, even many democratic states, several democratic states, have these kinds of laws, and, the question for the supreme court, i would leave this to lis is they may be reticent in overturning in sweeping fashion, that is what the folks against the law want, sweeping fashion to pitch the whole thing out. if they do that, it would be rather chaotic. >> how, juan, just chicken would be it? of this court to just send it back -- i know, the terms are inelegant for the high court. but to send this thing back to the 9th circuit and let stand their reversal of proposition 8, again, a democratic result of -- from a democratic process, your thoughts? >> well, in fact, that was -- i think, the news out of the court today, was, several of the justices question whether or not they have a ruling, the so-called standing. they said, you know, look, basically what the 9th circuit sa
the proposition that a state has standing to defend the constitutionality of a state law un- -- beyond dispute. the question then is, who represents the state? now, in a state that has initiative, the whole process would be defeated if the only people who could defend the statute are the elected public officials. the whole point -- you know this better than i do, because you're from california -- the whole point of the initiative was to allow the people to circumvent public officials about whom they were suspicious. so if you reject that proposition, what is left is the proposition that the state -- state law can choose some other person, some other group to defend the constitutionality of a state law. and the california supreme has told us that the plaintiffs in this case are precisely those people. so how do you get around that? >> the only -- that's exactly what the california supreme court thought. the california supreme court thought that it could decide that the proponents, whoever they were, and this could be 25 years after the election, it could be one of the proponents, it could be fo
that there is no consequence to the law, it is like the gun laws that are already on the books. did you see what i did? however, will this dilute the city's laws? they said this is not a law to be enforced. it is just an idea, a concept. how will you follow the law? what good is a stoplight? >> good p oi nt. there is something off about passing a law you have no intention of enforcing to say we are doing this to protect freedom or security or whatever it is. i don't like the subtext where they talk about we also want to discourage the federal government from coming in and taking our guns. it is like, we are going to arm ourselves just in case it all goes down and everything. >> they could be talking about the government of the town or the state, right? >> they could be. you know that georgia government is oppressive. >> shibani, let's talk about business. could this improve the business of the town if everybody sees this as safe some. >> i have no intention of going to nelson, georgia ever in my life. i don't care if they pass this gun law or not. i will never set foot near this town. this is not good for busi
. [laughter] i happily attended stanford law school, and in the process, i met my husband to be, john o'connor, and he was a year behind me in law school. we decided to get married, and i graduated from the law school and we both liked to eat, and that meant one of us is going to have to work come in since i was out of law school, that was me. and i thought no problem getting a job. there were at least 40 notices on stanford's bulletin board at the law school, from law firms in california saying stanford law graduates, we have this, we would be happy to talk to you about job opportunities, give us a call. there were 40 different messages from different law firms in california on the bulletin board. so i called every one of those notices. not a single one would even give me an interview. i said why? they said we don't hire women. and that was the way it was. i got out of law school i just about 1952, but isn't that amazing? they wouldn't even talk. and i really did need to get a job. [laughter] i heard that the county attorney and san mateo county california, the county seat is in redwoo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,394 (some duplicates have been removed)